Digital TV Dinner

Digital TV Dinner

Digital TV Dinner (Above) is one of the first known pieces of glitch artwork, supported by Bettancourt (2017: 23) who claims that:

This video is one of the first to create this type of visual digital glitch and employ it as th primary source material.

It was produced in 1978, by Jamie Fenton and Raul Zaritsky, whilst Dick Ainsworth created the soundtrack. It reminds me of waiting for video games to load on a ZX Spectrum computer. In the 1980s, video cassette players would often need tracking to reset the video which randomly starts scrolling up the screen.

In Digital TV Dinner, the glitches have been forced, by the unexpected removal of the game cartridge. Betancourt (2017: 35) continues by saying that this ‘unanticipated imagery…have become a standard part of the visual language of media art generally.

In many ways, glitches are nothing new, they were here before digital technology. We learned to accommodate them as part of the service. Nowadays, we tolerate the pixelated images which are sporadically appear amidst digitally streamed images on the screens of our digital devices.

Meanwhile, Betancourt (2017) likens the flat geometric imagery of Digital TV Dinner with the work of Josef Albers (Below).

Interaction of Colour for Sale, by Josef Albers

Interaction of Colour for Sale, by Josef Albers

Assignment 4 (Revisited)

Glitch Art in Theory and Practice